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yo4561
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A confusing nested parallelism structure

by yo4561 Mon Jan 11, 2021 10:27 pm

Parallel structure: "(by) (its) A + B, as well as (by) C".

Question 1: Why wouldn't you need to repeat the "its" before element C?

Question 2: I thought that you do not use a comma when "as well as" is used as a conjunction?

Thank you :)
esledge
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Re: A confusing nested parallelism structure

by esledge Tue Jan 26, 2021 10:06 pm

Question 1: Parallelism rules are funny about things like articles and (sometimes) pronouns...they can match, but don't have to, and it's case-by-case.

Example: The dog breed is known for its distinctive tail and nose, as well as for having a wonderful temperament.

I used "for" instead of "by," but this is the same idea as your question. While it wouldn't be wrong to say "for its wonderful temperament," it's not wrong this way. In fact, the use of "as well as" to start a new list and the fact that the ending is differently phrased both reinforce the idea that "distinctive" only describes the tail and nose (not the temperament). What really matters is that both parts logically and grammatically follow the root phrase:
good: The dog breed is known for its distinctive tail and nose.
good: The dog breed is known for having a wonderful temperament.

Question 2: That's not a rule I have memorized, but it seems to be correct. However, when "as well as" is following another list with an "and," a comma seems to be used. (I don't know why...the GMAT doesn't really test comma use vs. comma omission, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.)

Correct example: A working verb shows tense, mood, and voice, as well as number and person in some circumstances.
Emily Sledge
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ManhattanGMAT
yo4561
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Re: A confusing nested parallelism structure

by yo4561 Sat Jan 30, 2021 9:54 am

esledge wrote:Question 1: Parallelism rules are funny about things like articles and (sometimes) pronouns...they can match, but don't have to, and it's case-by-case.

Example: The dog breed is known for its distinctive tail and nose, as well as for having a wonderful temperament.

I used "for" instead of "by," but this is the same idea as your question. While it wouldn't be wrong to say "for its wonderful temperament," it's not wrong this way. In fact, the use of "as well as" to start a new list and the fact that the ending is differently phrased both reinforce the idea that "distinctive" only describes the tail and nose (not the temperament). What really matters is that both parts logically and grammatically follow the root phrase:
good: The dog breed is known for its distinctive tail and nose.
good: The dog breed is known for having a wonderful temperament.

Question 2: That's not a rule I have memorized, but it seems to be correct. However, when "as well as" is following another list with an "and," a comma seems to be used. (I don't know why...the GMAT doesn't really test comma use vs. comma omission, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.)

Correct example: A working verb shows tense, mood, and voice, as well as number and person in some circumstances.



Thank you so much Emily! As always, you always show me the GMAT light :) To clarify this part "While it wouldn't be wrong to say "for its wonderful temperament," it's not wrong this way.".... did you mean its wrong this way? The coffee didn't quite kick in yet, but I just wanted to gently confirm this with you.
esledge
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Re: A confusing nested parallelism structure

by esledge Tue Feb 02, 2021 12:10 pm

Sorry for not being clear! I meant that both of these are acceptable:
The dog breed is known for its distinctive tail and nose, as well as for having a wonderful temperament.
The dog breed is known for its distinctive tail and nose, as well as for its wonderful temperament.
Emily Sledge
Instructor
ManhattanGMAT