Verbal questions from any Manhattan Prep GMAT Computer Adaptive Test. Topic subject should be the first few words of your question.
elenas903
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously

by elenas903 Thu Nov 10, 2016 7:51 am

RonPurewal wrote:
Khush wrote:-> the difference between "more obviously dangerous"and "obviously more dangerous" is that :

More obviously dangerous visibly more dangerous/ looks like it is more dangerous

Obviously more dangerous actually more dangerous/ Clearly more dangerous/the author himself says that it is indeed more dangerous


am i correct?


yes.

1) will it be correct if we write the choice B as : "The javelin has a sharp point and thus is more obviously dangerous than the discus."


This would work.

Note"”you've also switched "more" and "obviously"; you didn't put those in boldface, so, not sure whether you noticed. (In the original choice B, those two words are in the opposite order, making that choice nonsense.)

can we also write "hence" in place of "thus"?


Yes.



I cannot comprehend why it is nonsense: The javelin has a sharp point and thus is obviously more dangerous than the discus; however, the discus is actually more likely to injure bystanders because, especially when wet, it can slip out of the thrower's hand and fly in a random trajectory.

A more need a than but than ( the discus) does not refer to more obviously dangerous
To me is more obviously dangerous is awkward

please help me with that
thanks
RonPurewal
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously

by RonPurewal Mon Nov 28, 2016 1:59 am

"obviously more dangerous" means more dangerous, since that's what the words say. this contradicts the second part of the sentence (which says that the other implement is more dangerous).

the only sensible interpretation is that the danger of the javelin is more obvious than that of the discus—but that the discus is actually more dangerous.
these ideas do not contradict each other.
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously

by ajaym8 Sun Jan 01, 2017 4:36 am

RonPurewal wrote:"obviously more dangerous" means more dangerous, since that's what the words say. this contradicts the second part of the sentence (which says that the other implement is more dangerous).

the only sensible interpretation is that the danger of the javelin is more obvious than that of the discus—but that the discus is actually more dangerous.
these ideas do not contradict each other.


Thanks to Manhattan team, I have understood most aspects of this question.
However, could you please highlight the differences between usages of "even though" and "however".

Ex.
I am studying tonight, even though there is no lamp available. - sentence 1
I am studying tonight, however, there is no lamp available. - sentence 2

Sentence 1 means that I am studying tonight despite having no lamp available.
Meaning of Sentence 2 also looks similar to me.
Is my thought process fine ? Can you please help, instructors ?

Thanks,
RonPurewal
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously

by RonPurewal Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:22 am

there are 2 major differences. one is purely grammatical; the other concerns the meaning of the resulting sentence.

__

grammatically:

• "however" is an ADVERB. it DOES NOT CONNECT sentences to each other, and it DOES NOT affect the surrounding grammar.
if the sentence is a run-on (= 2 complete sentences "stuck together") WITHOUT "however", then it's still a run-on WITH "however".
thus, your sentence #2 isn't actually a sentence; it's a run-on.

• "even though", on the other hand, CAN connect two complete sentences. (in fact, "even though" MUST connect two complete sentences.)

thus, if one of these two is ever directly substituted for the other -- in a context where all the rest of the grammar remains the same -- then, at least one version is going to be ungrammatical.

__
RonPurewal
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously

by RonPurewal Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:23 am

in terms of meaning:
these two are basically inverses of each other.

"X; however, Y"
"Y, even though X"
...these are approximately equivalent
in terms of meaning.
in both cases, "X" is a CIRCUMSTANCE that WORKS AGAINST "Y", or that would MAKE US EXPECT THE OPPOSITE of "Y".

e.g.,
Ray did not study for the test at all; however, he received one of the highest scores in the class.
Ray received one of the highest scores in the class on the test, even though he did not study for it at all.


...so, your sentence #1 makes sense, but your sentence #2 is written backward.
yo4561
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously

by yo4561 Sun Jan 10, 2021 10:42 am

"The javelin has a sharp point and is obviously more dangerous than the discus..."

To confirm is the "has a sharp point" and "is obviously more dangerous" parts of this sentence parallel because they are two verb phrases?
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Re: The javelin has a sharp point, which is more obviously

by esledge Thu Jan 21, 2021 12:21 pm

yo4561 wrote:"The javelin has a sharp point and is obviously more dangerous than the discus..."

To confirm is the "has a sharp point" and "is obviously more dangerous" parts of this sentence parallel because they are two verb phrases?

Yes, exactly! (Alternatively, these verb phrases are called "predicates," both of which go with the same subject, "javelin.")
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